Transpacific Engagements: Trade, Translation, and Visual Culture of Entangled Empires (1565–1898)

This event is the second of a three-part series presented by the Ayala Museum in partnership with the Getty Research Institute and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut.
 
Scholars discuss the new book, Transpacific Engagements: Trade, Translation, and Visual Culture of Entangled Empires (1565–1898). The conversation explores global culture and economic exchange on the transpacific routes between Asia and the Americas between the 16th and 19th centuries — an era of competition for global trade networks — and how those interchanges have made a profound impact on contemporary art and culture, especially in the cosmopolitan cities of Manila and Los Angeles along the Pacific Rim.

With the participation of,
Dr. Aaron Hyman, Assistant Professor, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. Ruth Franch De Llobet, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor of History, NYU Shanghai
Dr. Stephanie Porras, Chair, Associate Professor, Newcombe Art Department, Tulane University
Dr. Florina H. Capistrano-Baker, formerly Museum Director of the Ayala Museum where she is currently a consultant. 
Dr. Meha Priyadarshini, Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Edinburgh.

Two other conversations in this series are organized by the University of Edinburgh/Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut on March 30, 2022, and at the Getty Research Institute on May 25, 2022
 
You can now get a copy of Transpacific Engagements: Trade, Translation, and Visual Culture of Entangled Empires (1565–1898) — a joint publication by Getty Research Institute, the Ayala Museum, and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut — through the MuseumShop. Also find more information on a related ongoing exhibition, Intertwined: Transpacific, Transcultural Philippines, curated by Dr. Florina Capistrano-Baker.
 
Penned by authors from all over the globe, the essays in the book address cultural and artistic exchanges in the Asia-Pacific region with an emphasis on the Spanish and American enterprises. While most of the essays center on the Philippine experience, we see how other parts of the world, notably South and Southeast Asia and Europe, were also impacted by these linkages.

date_range 27 Apr 2022
access_time 8:00 PM- 9:00 PM
location_on Online
info_outline Free to view on Ayala Museum's Facebook page. Global date and time guide: April 27, 2022, Wed | Manila, Hong Kong, Beijing: 20:00; CET: 14:00 / April 26, 2022, Tue | PDT/PST: 5:00; EST: 8:00;

About the Facilitators

Dr. Aaron Hyman

Speaker

Aaron M. Hyman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University. He works on early modern art in a global frame, with a particular focus on northern Europe and colonial Latin America. He is the author of Rubens in Repeat: The Logic of the Copy in Colonial Latin America from the Getty Research Institute (2021). He has been the recipient of grants from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, and the Belgian American Educational Foundation, among others; and his research is currently supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Newberry Library, and the Thomas Foundation.

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Dr. Stephanie Porras

Speaker

Stephanie Porras specializes in the visual and material culture of Northern Europe and the Spanish world, from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries. She is an Associate Professor of Art History and Chair of the Newcomb Art Department at Tulane University. She has published widely on the art of the Northern Renaissance and is the author of the books Pieter Bruegel's Historical Imagination, Art of the Northern Renaissance: Courts, Commerce, Devotion and the forthcoming The First Viral Images: Maerten de Vos, Antwerp print and the early modern globe.

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Dr. Ruth Franch de Llobet

Speaker

Ruth Franch De Llobet is a Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor of History at New York University Shanghai. Her work looks at the significant role of Manila’s criollo community—Eurasians born or raised in the Philippines—in the construction of Filipino political thought during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. She is currently developing a second monographic research project in which I explore how the Chinese mestizo community, a transnational group, transformed itself into a Filipino elite in the late 18th century by co-opting colonial institutions. She is currently working on two manuscripts regarding the history of the Philippines. The first one is “Demostración del mísero estado de las Islas Filipinas”: A “Proyectista” Economic Colonial Program on the Philippines, 1763-1765, and Orphans of Empire: Bourbon Reforms, Constitutional Impasse, and the Rise of Filipino-Creole Consciousness in an Age of Revolution.

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Dr. Meha Priyadarshini

Editor

Meha Priyadarshini is a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh. She specializes in early modern global history, focusing especially on connections between Asia and colonial Latin America. Her monograph Chinese Porcelain in Colonial Mexico: Material Worlds of an Early Modern Trade (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) is a study of the transpacific trade connection through the production, trade, and consumption of porcelain. She completed a PhD at Columbia University and has held numerous fellowships, including one at the Getty Research Institute, as well as at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz.

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Dr. Florina H. Capistrano-Baker

Editor

Florina H. Capistrano-Baker received a PhD, MPhil, and MA from the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. She has received numerous grants and fellowships from Columbia University, the Asian Cultural Council, the Ford Foundation, the Japan Foundation, the American Association of University Women, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Getty Research Institute. Her recent publications include Philippine Gold: Treasures of Forgotten Kingdoms (Asia Society and Ayala Foundation, 2015).

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